Volume 24, Issue 4 (1-2019)                   Back to this Issue | Back to browse issues page

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Aghabarary M, Dehghan Nayeri N, Varvani Farahani A. Perception of futile care: A qualitative study . Hayat. 2019; 24 (4) :381-404
URL: http://hayat.tums.ac.ir/article-1-2699-en.html
1- Dept. of Nursing, School of Nursing, Alborz University of Medical Sciences, Karaj, Iran
2- Nursing and Midwifery Care Research Center, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran , nahid.nayeri@gmail.com
3- Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
Abstract:   (1145 Views)
Background & Aim: Concerns over limited equipment and resources particularly in the intensive care units have raised the issues of medical futility, futile treatment, and futile care. Considering that there is no consensus in the definition of the concept of futile care, this study aimed to explore the concept of futile care, especially in terms of clarifying it with the concept of futile treatment.
Methods & Materials: This is a qualitative study conducted using the conventional content analysis approach. In this study, 22 nurses, eight medical specialists, four medical ethics specialists, and one sharia specialist, were purposively recruited with the consideration of maximum variation. Data were collected using individual, in-depth, semi-structured interviews.
Results: The main theme of the study was “care is never futile: care as goal”. This theme is consisted of four main categories including: 1. care as an indispensable service; 2. care as an ongoing process focused on human existence; 3. care as a sacred and essential process in Islam; 4. the necessity for differentiating between care and cure: futile treatment instead of futile care.
Conclusion: Although, in some cases, and depending on the circumstances, medical interventions may be futile, care is never futile. According to the findings of this study, the terms medical futility and futile care cannot be used interchangeably because interchangeable use of these terms can devalue the nature of care. Thus, it is necessary to use the term of “futile treatment” instead of “futile care”.
 
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Type of Study: Research | Subject: Nursing Care
Published: 2019/02/25 | ePublished: 2019/02/25

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